And so to the end. Marc on his third and Lee his final bow.

The womanly figure has made a come back this season. Miuccia Prada started the ball rolling in Milan and others have jumped in too. Most recently Marc Jacobs for Louis Vuitton. The full figured (in modeling terms) ladies were brought in to show off the décolleté to its full effect. The Fifties was the decade of choice here. Mid calf skirts, jackets pulled in tight at the waist as if to emphasize the over spill at the top.  Whilst the clothing was beautifully constructed, the fabrics rich and luxurious, after the playfulness of Miu Miu, it seemed a little, well lackluster. The accessories featured heavily and in some ways it was not about the clothes at all but more about showing the bags and shoes. Elle MacPherson closed the show in a very large, strapless pale raspberry gown, which was extremely grand and she looked exceedingly elegant.

source: look.co.uk

Sarah Mower agrees: “If there was little to zero variety in silhouette—and the dirndl-esque petticoated skirt can't be for the many—the items and trimmings exemplified the Vuitton knack for classy detail, as in fur buttons and collars and glittery heels. And above all, this Louis Vuitton show provided a charming backdrop to display the bags. This season, it's a zillion mignonne reinterpretations of the classic Speedy. Here, that functional shape, designed in the 1930's, came flocked and sequined, smothered in guipure lace over satin, or woven in metallic thread and done up in fox.

source: look.co.uk

I have purposefully left this for the last show – a little out of sync but I think it ties up the circle. I started this show circuit with the sad news of the death of Lee McQueen. Since then there have been many tributes and none more than at London Fashion Week. There has been talk of what will happen to the line, will the show still go on in Paris this season, who will take over….all unanswered until now. At least the show questions can be resolved. The collection was shown, to a limited audience of selected editors. There were no theatrics, just the ornate surroundings with a calm, serene atmosphere of these editors waiting to see what would appear. Sarah Burton, McQueen’s 2nd in command described the journey of the collection:

“"He wanted to get back to the handcraft he loved, and the things that are being lost in the making of fashion," she said. "He was looking at the art of the Dark Ages, but finding light and beauty in it. He was coming in every day, draping and cutting pieces on the stand."

There were 16 pieces shown, at the time of his death 80% was finished.  The fabrics were ornate and heavily referenced the past – medieval almost. The pieces were exquisite. Not really daywear, but he was always against the flow of the mainstream. McQueen channeled his creative to produce some if the finest work – here is no exception.

source: SHOWstudio photographer: Chris Moore

Closing shows with grand finales and big gowns would have been signature for Alexander McQueen. But as Alex Fury reflects:” in contrast to McQueen's last show, the dazzle and unbelievable spectacle of his trademark theatrical fireworks in full blaze, this collection was presented to tiny groups perched mere feet away from the garments in a gilt-scrolled salon. And, as ever, it was spectacular, emotional, filled with the drama and pulsing high of a stellar talent being pushed to the very limits of its genius. I don't think I have used the word 'genius' before, when writing about fashion, but here it feels appropriate. The air throbbed with a mingling of emotions - loss, sadness, regret and, overwhelmingly, love.”

source: SHOWstudio photographer: Chris Moore