Pump up the Volume

There was a run of shows, which were more than just a catwalk, but a spectacle of art. Whether it was the hairpieces or skirts at Junya Watanaybe, the design at Comme des Garcons or the actual involvement of the designers as at Viktor and Rolf, it certainly challenged the fashion folk with their interpretations of all they had seen. Volume was a key theme for these three shows – all using the form in a very different way. Rai Kawakubo padded the models and then kept adding – until you though they may burst, and in parts they did, the padding coming through the seams and displaying the inner workings.

Comme des Garcons Autumn Winter 2010

source: elleuk.com photographer: IMAXtree

Dolly Jones @ vogue.co.uk review reads as “…A designer like no other, Kawakubo’s conceptualism is a refreshing bolt from the blue during Paris Fashion Week – no matter what everybody else might be doing, you can depend upon her to explore a new idea to the full. What was so clever about today was the play on proportions and scale, so that after almost a full day of looking at clothes you can imagine living life in, this called into question the reality of construction and the limits of convention.”

Comme des Garcons Autumn Winter 2010

source: elleuk.com photographer: IMAXtree

“Inside Decoration” was the title to the show. A loose explanation to the clothes and whilst many reviewers have sited how they see the show, it really is up to each individual to make of it what you will. Exactly like a piece of art.

Then came Viktor and Rolf. They too appeared to reference archive shows, theirs being that of the Russian Doll and Maggie Rizer nearly 10 years ago. This season Kristen McMenamy was the leading lady. She took to the runway dressed in half of the mainline collection on her frame – how she stood is beyond me – then each layer was carefully peeled away by the designers to be placed on a waiting model that then walked the walk and showed the creation to the audience. There were capes and dresses galore. Each showing how versatile the design is. The process then reversed and Kristen was redressed but each piece turning into another, as if to emphasise the point. The presentation was a spectacle, definitely, memorable of course but what of the clothes? Well as much as the collection was beautifully presented and to me ingenious. It was pleasure to watch, and I really don’t think anyone disagrees with this, as it is obvious the craftsmanship is astounding, the general opinion was perhaps that the actual clothing was not.

Victor and Rolf  Autumn/Winter 2010

source: look.co.uk

Nicole Phelps @ style: “Ultimately, you can't help thinking this show will be remembered more for the spectacle than the clothes.”

And Alex Fury @ Show studio: “They all fitted into the concept, certainly, but in the end the concept didn't really fit into the clothes, or at least wasn't reflected. The excitement and the buzz around the Viktor & Rolf show was for the spectacle itself, the 'machinery' of the fashion show rather than the fashions it offered”

Victor and Rolf  Autumn/Winter 2010

source: look.co.uk

How ever the last word come from Rolf: “. “We wanted to show that the Viktor & Rolf fashion house is a “Glamour Factory”, where we produce clothes with a little bit of magic. We feel like the modern Willy Wonkas of the fashion world,” and everyone likes a fantasy now and then.

Victor and Rolf  Autumn/Winter 2010

source: look.co.uk